Feeds

Queen's Speech: 'Problem of matching IP addresses' to be probed

Theresa May's proposed Snooper's Charter absent from law-making programme

Mobile application security vulnerability report

The Queen opened a new session of Parliament this morning and - as expected - Home Secretary Theresa May's Communications Data bill was absent from the government's upcoming programme of law-making for the next year.

However, as indicated by Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg - who said late last month that the so-called Snoopers' Charter wouldn't happen under his watch - provisions are to be put in place to aid spooks and police in accessing information they need to supposedly protect the British public.

The Queen said today:

In relation to the problem of matching internet protocol addresses, my government will bring forward proposals to enable the protection of the public and the investigation of crime in cyberspace.

Clegg recently said that "the specific issue" with IP addresses needed to be looked at. The Liberal Democrat leader wrote in the Daily Telegraph in April:

Right now, there are not enough IP addresses to go round for all of the devices being used. Temporary addresses are attached to computers and phones while they are online, but the records of these are patchy, which means they cannot easily be matched back to individuals.

The police say a clearer picture would be a huge help in their investigations and we should explore how that can be done.

Clegg recently said he was effectively killing May's proposed bill, which would have massively increased surveillance of Brits' internet activity, because he did not consider it to be proportionate or workable as it stood.

The Home Office responded curtly to the deputy PM's comments by telling The Register at the time that talks about the bill were "ongoing". But its absence from the Queen's Speech today reveals that the Liberal Democrats - the junior member of the Coalition government - had scored some political points by refusing to include May's proposals in the law-making programme for the year. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.