Feeds

FTTN cabinet survives Kiwi car crash

Malcolm Turnbull's FTTN NBN plan now proven to be physically robust

High performance access to file storage

Update Maclolm Turnbull will be smiling today. The communications spokesperson for Australia's opposition recently advanced a fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) plan for the nation's multi-billion National Broadband Network. That plan calls for tens of thousands of roadside cabinets to be constructed as the node to which fibre connects, before using copper for the final copper run to a user's premises.

The cabinets have been criticised as electricity-chewing eyesores that could represent weak points in the network, as each would represent a bottleneck for the neighbourhood they serve.

But a car crash in Auckland, New Zealand, has just shown the cabinets can be rather tougher that one might imagine.

Posters on Kiwi tech community Geekzone yesterday noticed that a car (probably a four-wheel drive) ran into a FTTN cabinet used by Kiwi Telco Chorus to deliver its Whisper service. Posters in the thread were sent emails of the damage by Chorus, including the picture below.

A New Zealand FTTTN cabinet that survived being hit by a car

A FTTN cabinet in New Zealand that was hit by a car and kept working
Source: Geekzone

New Zealand's National Business Review now reports that the cabinet kept working for hours after the incident, with Chorus spokes-singers saying there was enough slack cable beneath the box that being knocked off its pedestal wasn't fatal. Nor did being cut off from its power source end service: an on-board battery kept connections alive and a replacement is due to go into service today.

The happy news of continued service and swift replacement will doubtless put a smile on Turnbull's face, as it's a nice little proof point for the robustness of his plan. Those hoping to use their 4WDs to …. errr …. accelerate fibre-to-the-premises upgrades to their local broadband infrastructure will, Vulture South expects, soon be back at their drawing boards. ®

Update

Further posts to the thread we linked to above suggest internet service did not last for very long, if at all, once the cabinet took the hit. Phone services also appear to have been disrupted and Chorus is saying residents can expect a three-day outage.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.