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VMware sells WaveMaker to Pramati

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VMware has got rid of WaveMaker, an open source tool that helps casual developers build Java apps, after spending two years trying to develop the technology

The deal sees Java-specialist Pramati acquire "certain assets" of WaveMaker, according to a statement issued by the company. These assets include WaveMaker's core technologies, along with information on its customers, and some staff including its head of sales, Pramati's president Vijay Pullur told The Register, along with WaveMaker-related trademarks. Pramati isn't getting any VMware technical staff, he said.

WaveMaker has 35,000 active monthly users, and was bought by VMware in 2011 as the virtualization company sought to buy in technologies that had a loyal developer following.

The technology provided a Java development environment for less skilled developers, and came with various ease of access features including drag-and-drop dev tools.

In an age where many Java developers use IDEs like Eclipse, Netbeans, JDeveloper, or just Notepad, WaveMaker looks somewhat out of place, and doesn't appear to fit with VMware's recent strategy of trying to pull in highly-technical developers via its Pivotal spin-off.

"Wavemaker has been a very good strong tool used by a large developer community in building cloud applications," Pullur said, highlighting that the product "reduces the actual code required to write apps".

Financial terms of the acquisition were not disclosed. "We came to know that VMware was divesting certain non-core assets. When we figured out Wavemaker could potentially be one of them we started negotiating with them, it took a few months," Pullur said. "I do believe VMware did have other options." ®

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