Feeds

Cisco clambers aboard gig Wi-Fi bandwagon

Product catapult loaded with 802.11ac kit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Cisco has joined the growing list of vendors putting the 802.11ac “gigabit WiFi” standard into live kit, launching a “Wave 1” module for it Aironet 3600 series of access points, and promising “Wave 2” support in a future upgrade module.

The current kit, quoth the Borg, supports WiFi speed up to 1.3 Gbps, which in deployment means wireless networks will be able to support greater numbers of devices at better-than-limping per-user bandwidth.

Cisco has sewn some marvellous confusion in the press with its announcement, which red-herrings WiFi network speed with discussion of mobile traffic growth.

But the import of 802.11ac in enterprise, particularly campus environments, is its main appeal, something highlighted by Cisco's drawing attention to a hospital and a university as early buyers.

A big difference between 802.11ac and its predecessor 802.11n is that the newer standard can operate multi-user multiple-input and multiple-output schemes (MIMO). An 802.11n system would devote all of the MIMO paths to a single access-point-to-user communication, while 802.11ac can split the antenna paths between users (trading off single-user speed for higher capacity).

The 5GHz-band 802.11ac Wave 1 kit gets its top speed operating at its full carrier bandwidth of 80 MHz, with 20 MHz and 40 MHz slices also supported, and supports up to three spatial streams (that is, three MIMO transmission paths). The Wave 2 kit will add optional 160 MHz channel width, or paired 80 + 80 MHz channels. Its physical layer link speed is specified at above 3 Gbps. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.