Feeds

Google Now lands on iOS

Siri: What's it like to have competition in your backyard?

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Google has released its signature search app, Google Now, on Apple's iOS.

Google's search apps have been on iOS for years and have included voice search for quite some time. The new release is notable inasmuch as it brings some of Google's more advanced search services that resemble, challenge or surpass Apple's own voice-driven search app Siri into Apple's own devices (and therefore setting up a two-sided fight for market dominance narrative beloved of many technology industry observers and followers).

Google's talking up Now as almost prescient, thanks to “cards” that stack up to provide quick updates to information you search for a lot. Traffic updates, weather forecasts and information about the punctuality (or otherwise) of commercial airline flights are all suggested as cards everyday users might want to use.

Quite how cards spawn is mysterious: the app says it'll make them as it sees fit. As soon as we told the app that Vulture South's office is in the suburb of North Sydney it produced a card for local weather. We then tried feeding the app some searches, such as a request for the next train from Vulture South's North Sydney eyrie to the station nearest your correspondent's home. The iPhone version of the app responded with a teensy-weensy page full of microscopic timetable detail that was impossible to read in context on an iPhone 5. No card spawned to make the information easier to consume. But after we searched for a nearby soup vendor (Vulture South has the sniffles) a card appeared informing of us of a nearby Japanese restaurant.

Voice search, which in this author's experience has been decent in past iOS releases of Google apps, was down for a time and then failed to make sense of the silent "w" in the term "Dulwich Hill Bicycle Club". Siri also struggles to produce useful results on that query, making the Siri vs. Home race (if we must couch it in such terms) one in which the winner and runner up have plenty of improvement left in them. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.