Feeds

Apache attack drives traffic to malware

Blackhole redirect served by modified daemon binary

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

A security researcher is warning that an attack on the Apache Web server is increasingly showing up in the wild, and has published a free Python tool to check their configurations.

The attack is designed to avoid leaving disk footprints, according to this post analysing the backdoor. It exists as a modified httpd file that redirects HTTP requests to the well-known Blackhole exploit pack.

Redirected victims hitting the compromised server are remembered so they aren't redirected a second time. The redirection looks like the original URL, with a base64 encoded string added, used by the backdoor to record parameters describing the redirected client to ensure the right payload is delivered (for example, identifying if it had originally requested a Javascript file).

Apart from the modified httpd file, everything associated with the exploit exists only in 6 MB of shared memory, with configuration pushed through obfuscated HTTP requests to evade logging.

The analysis has identified 23 commands in the binary, all of them two-character hex bytes (DU, ST, T1 and so on). Thos commands are invoked by a POST command to a crafted URL including “SECID=” as a cookie header. As the author of the post, Pierre-Marc Bureau notes, “we believe the URLs to redirect clients are sent to the backdoor using this method. The redirection information will be stored encrypted in the allocated shared memory region.”

Other capabilities of the commands include:

  • Setting redirection conditions;
  • Whitelisting user agents; and
  • Blacklisting IP addresses to avoid detection.

Because the attack sets loose permissions on the shared directory, other processors can access it. This tool, dump_dcorked_config.py, verifies the presence of the shared memory region and dumps its contents into a file for analysis. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.