Feeds

Chinese cops shutter PRC's biggest pirate movie site

Symbolic move but country remains an IP Wild West

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

The Chinese authorities’ ongoing efforts to crack down on piracy have claimed another big scalp after police shuttered the nation's largest online source of not-entirely-properly-sourced movies last Friday, cuffing eight execs along the way.

Siluhd.com is said to have over 140 million members, who each pay 50 yuan (£5) every month to access a vast range of movies the site probably isn't really allowed to offer.

Police arrested CEO Zhou Mou, who has been at the site since 2003, and seven other executives, finding 190 1TB hard disks at his home containing over 10,000 movies and TV shows, according to Caijing.

A further 30 of the company’s 139 employees are also apparently facing the slammer for their role in illegally distributing pirated content on a grand scale.

While China is certainly trying to portray itself as tough on IP theft, there was more than a hint of showmanship about the arrests. The site has been around for a decade, but the authorities chose last Friday – World Intellectual Property Day – to make their move.

Another pirated movie site, YYeTs.com, also appeared to have had its service interrupted as of last week, although claims the outage is only temporary, according to TechInAsia.

The high profile arrests come after e-commerce giant Alibaba Group last week announced its intention to co-operate with government and law enforcement agencies to share information on potential counterfeiters operating on its hugely popular C2C and B2C platforms.

From the government’s perspective, tougher action on piracy and counterfeiters will help it achieve its goal of growing the e-commerce industry into the world’s biggest by 2015, as well as making the PRC more attractive to foreign investors and even as an offshoring destination.

However, its IP protection regime remains a work in progress and, according to the Business Software Alliance, China has a software piracy rate of 77 per cent – making it still one of the world’s worst offenders. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.