Feeds

Cat ladies turned brand-squatters poke fun at religious right

Redditors, Tweets duped as well, what's not to like?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Redditers in Australia – and others – got a giggle out of one of the better bits of brand-squat-spoofing to arise on the Interwebs in recent times.

The Australian Christian Lobby, a lobby group with sufficient influence to regularly regale Canberra politicians about the country's inevitable slide towards ungulate matrimony by way of marriage equality, is the owner of its Australian domains, but had never followed the traditional brand-protection strategy of registering every possible variation of its name on as many registrars as possible.

Someone eventually spotted that the Australianchristianlobby.org domain remained vacant, and over the weekend, registered it so as to post a cheerful spoof site as the home of the ACL – “Australian Cat Ladies”, whose values include marriage equality, anathema to the “real” ACL.

The spoof, however, also got a hook-line-and-sinker response from some Twitter users and some Redditers, mistaking the opportunistic brand confusion for a domain-squat and gloated to the world at large along the lines of “The Australian Christian Lobby forgot to renew their domain & this happened”.

So let's be clear: the cheery satirists didn't execute a domain-squat (which is probably why, at the time of writing, the take-off still exists). They registered a completely vacant domain that the Australian Christian Lobby had ignored.

Australian Cat Ladies Logo

Not the Australian Christian Lobby

In the words of Australian Cat Ladies:

“It has come to our attention that there appears to be a case of mistaken identity between the ACL and another similarly named Australian lobby group. PLEASE NOTE, IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU DO NOT CONFUSE ‘Cat-Holics’ with ‘Catholics‘. (Although of course you can be both at the same time!)”

Many people have criticised the Australian Christian Lobby for not covering all possible variants of its domain, which sounds to Vulture South like “brand management for dummies” advice (“It's better to go bankrupt than to have someone else scoop your top-level domain!”) that somehow aligns with ICANN's aim to levy a little bit of tax on every business or individual it can.®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Mighty Blighty broadbanders beg: Let us lay cable in BT's, er, ducts
Complain to Ofcom that telco has 'effective monopoly'
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?