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Apple fanbois get one last chance to see spectre of Steve Jobs

Extra tickets printed after WWDC 2013 sells out in SECONDS

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Apple has taken pity on fanbois who were too slow to buy a ticket to its 2013 Worldwide Developer Conference, which sold out in seconds.

The iPhone giant has now coughed up a few more passes to keep its choked-up coders sweet.

Software programmers hoping to attend this year's annual love-in were floored after all the $1,599 tickets were snapped up in about two minutes last night. Now some lucky Apple adorers have been offered more passes for the extravaganza in June.

App crafter Eric Dolecki described the moment his ticket came through in a blog post headlined: "OMG! Apple rocks!!!" He wrote:

I pick up my phone and a nice guy tells me he's from Apple Developer Support and that they noticed that I tried to purchase a ticket today and that the transaction didn't go through. I told him that was true. I thought the next thing out of his mouth would be an apology or something – just to be nice.

He then proceeds to tell me that he's got good news – a ticket has been reserved for me in my name and that I'll be receiving an email from Developer Support within 12 hours with instructions on how to purchase the pass. He thanked me for supporting the platform.

And, via Le Reg foreign desk, Vincent Miller, the editor of francophone news website MacQuebec, also tweeted: "Turnaround! I will be present at WWDC 2013 to represent MacQuébec from 10 to 14 June. Yes. Great joy!"

This year Apple, co-founded by the late Steve Jobs, has promised to unveil new versions of its Mac OS X and iOS operating systems to its ravenous fans. The tech titan put its conference tickets on sale at a time that would suit developers on both sides of America as well as European devs.

Demand has been steadily growing for WWDC passes in recent years. Last year tickets sold out in two hours, while in 2011 tickets were available for 12 hours. Way back in 2009 they could be bought over the course of a month. The rapid sellout seems to contradict grim rumours about Cupertino's imminent demise, which is being dubbed Peak Apple. ®

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