Feeds

Can't find your motor? Apple patents solve car park conundrums

Cupertino to enable world+dog to find its lost Ladas

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Apple has filed a series of patents which will help people find their motors in a crowded car park and then open the doors without using a key.

The patents that emerged today are called "method for locating a vehicle" and "accessing a vehicle using portable devices".

The first sets out a system for anyone who wants to leave their motor in a "parking structure", or “car park” for anyone not fluent in Cupertinian.

This would allow a confused driver to discover the location of their car using a "portable computing device" which communicates with a network inside the carpark as well as a location system in the vehicle.

Using Bluetooth, a parked car would be able to transmit data about its location to wireless sensors built into the carpark, which could be embedded in gates, elevators or even in parking spaces themselves.

Cleverly, the sensors will be able to tell whether a car's engine is running using visual or audible clues, perhaps by listening in to see if an alarm is going off because the car door is open.

If the proposed iCarPark becomes a reality, it would mean an end to losing your motor during a visit to the shops.

The other patent allows drivers to open their car using their smartphone to replace the fobs currently used as car keys. Drivers will be able to grant one other device the right to access the car, as well as imposing limits on what times that device can start the engine, and even the speed the car can be driven at - perfect for the parents of petrolhead teenagers.

Apple has been looking to get involved in the car world for some time. The Register previously covered the release of an iBeetle, complete with all sorts of Apple bells and whistles, and nine automotive manufacturers have agreed to incorporate the Siri Eyes Free system, which allows drivers to use Siri without taking their eyes off the road.

Read the patents here and here. Both were filed in 2011. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD TO DIE, and this is WHY
Apple, er, couldn’t get parts for HDD models
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Microsoft fitness bands slapped on wrists: All YOUR HEALTH DATA are BELONG TO US
Wearable will deliver 'actionable insights for healthier living'
Lawyers mobilise angry mob against Apple over alleged 2011 Macbook Pro crapness
We suffered 'random bouts of graphical distortion' - fanbois
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Simplify SSL certificate management across the enterprise
Simple steps to take control of SSL across the enterprise, and recommendations for a management platform for full visibility and single-point of control for these Certificates.