Feeds

Microsoft hoists ZTE onto the Android patent bandwagon

Huawei and Googorola still holding out on licensing deals

Mobile application security vulnerability report

China's ZTE has become the latest firm to sign a licensing deal with Microsoft for its Android and Chrome patent portfolio.

The firm, which is one of the world's biggest smartphone makers, has agreed to stump up royalties to MS for Android and Chrome stuff just a week after Hon Hai's Foxconn signed a similar deal.

"The ZTE and Foxconn agreements show once more that technology companies around the world, including some of the world’s largest and fastest growing manufacturers anchored in China, recognize licensing is an effective way to share technology and build on each other’s work," Horacio Gutierrez, deputy general counsel at Microsoft, said in a blog post.

Redmond has successfully argued that Google's Android OS is full of Microsoft-owned technology and has bagged cash from major fandroid firms including Samsung, LG and HTC.

"Much of the current litigation in the so-called “smartphone patent wars” could be avoided if companies were willing to recognise the value of others’ creations in a way that is fair," Gutierrez opined.

"At Microsoft, experience has taught us that respect for intellectual property rights is a two-way street… This is why we have paid others more than $4 billion over the last decade to secure intellectual property rights."

Without naming names, he added that not all companies had been so forthcoming with the patent licences.

"We have worked for multiple years to reach an amicable solution with the few global companies who have yet to take a license, but so far they have been unwilling to address these issues in a fair manner. We’d prefer to consider these companies licensing partners and remain hopeful they can join the rest of the industry in the near future," he said.

Of the major manufacturers, Huawei the last of the big boys that Microsoft has yet to sign a deal with. Redmond also has continued issues with Google-owned Motorola, which is still in litigation with MS in cases across Europe and the US over Android and Microsoft's Xbox.

Gutierrez said that 80 per cent of Android mobes sold in the US and "a majority" of the ones sold globally are now covered by agreements with Microsoft. ®

The Power of One Infographic

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.