Feeds

Diagnostics tools ARE useful, but more for the vendor than me

Some add-ons should be set free...

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Storagebod It never ceases to amaze me that vendors believe that they can charge an additional fee for something which makes their product work properly, as it should have done in the first place.

I believe certain products should be free and I struggle in many ways to understand why they're not.

I can’t imagine they are sold an awful lot and most customers probably only come across them when they get an evaluation licence. And normally, this is because something is broken and third-line support needs more information and granularity than the normal free tools give.

I want you to imagine a self-tuning storage device, one that offers very little opportunity for the end-user to tune - where should any bespoke tuning be carried out on it, it will almost always be at the behest of the vendor.

So charging for a tool which monitors performance at a level that is incredibly hard for a customer to make any real use of is a little strange; charging for a tool which actually makes the vendor’s support teams' lives easier ... come on guys, that's not really on.

EMC Isilon InsightIQ is just such a tool.

Of course, it is really useful when you need it - but you really don’t need it very often. It makes EMC’s life easier both from a support point of view and from a sales point of view.

It gives really good performance diagnostics - many of which, however, are not that useful until you are in a situation where you need support. It allows growth forecasting, too (so you can buy more Isilon, of course).

Of course it is an invaluable tool to the EMC account team, but I’ll settle for them just making it free. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.