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Facebook to plonk $1.5bn data centre in Iowa - report

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Facebook is reportedly building a $1.5bn data centre in the US state of Iowa - but for now the company is remaining quiet about its plans.

According to local newspaper, the Des Moines Register - which cited legislative sources - the free content ad network is apparently behind "the most technologically advanced data centre in the world."

However, when approached by The Register, Facebook declined to comment.

The paper reported that the proposal, which is dubbed Project Catapult, would involve a build in two $500m phases on a 1.4 million square foot site near Altoona in Iowa.

The final cost of the facility, which was "fiercely" competed for by Iowa and Nebraska, is expected to be around $1.5bn.

Facebook currently owns three data centres: one in Prineville, Oregon; another in Forest City, North Carolina; and a yet-to-be-completed facility in Luleå, Sweden. ®

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