Feeds

Dell axes IT channel middlemen, installs Windows in the factory

Wanna buy a Dell till? No need to pay that integrator

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Microsoft has granted Dell the power to install Windows on specialised computers before they leave the factory - neatly bypassing the distribution channel.

Typically, customers buy these machines via an integrator, which provides the software with the kit.

But now Dell's hardware-building biz OEM Solutions can manufacture and ship systems complete with a copy of Windows Embedded and matching official Certificate of Authenticity (COA) stickers.

These COAs are the unique security labels that prove a copy of the computer's accompanying software is genuine, paid for, and therefore not a pirated knockoff. And the Texan behemoth has secured a stock of its own to slap on boxes on the assembly lines.

As the name of the computers' operating system suggests, these Windows Embedded machines are destined for fixed roles, such as shopping tills and data centre infrastructure servers. They run special flavours of Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and others.

Dell reckons it is the first tier-one computer maker to have been made a global distributor of Windows Embedded. The change means Dell no longer needs work with partners, such as Avnet, and customers can go direct to the PC and server maker for specialised systems.

You can get an overview of the kinds of computers Dell's OEM solutions business builds here.

Jason Szatkiewicz, Dell OEM solutions product planning, wrote online: "Before this program rollout, many customers would go through an integrator, but now they can come directly to Dell. Dell OEM can install the customer's image, including the operating system and supporting applications, activate it, and provide recovery media - so a complete solution can be distributed for customers through this agreement."

By cutting out the middleman Dell said it hopes to streamline its processes: by skipping over third-parties, it can ship systems to customers more quickly than before. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.