Feeds

Geolocation tech to save 60 Londoners from being run over next year

Look out there's an accident hotspot just ther - Aarghh

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Metropolitan Police will be using software from Croydon-based GGP Systems to analyse road traffic accidents in the capital, continuing a 30-year-old process to minimise road deaths.

The plan is to reduce the number people being killed and seriously injured on London's roads by 40 per cent by 2020. That's Mayor Boris Johnson's intention, but making it happen is largely down to the police. This is where GGP comes into the picture with its gathering of data for analysis, allowing officers to locate dangerous spots and mitigate against them.

"Using the GGP GIS (Geographic Information System) we can record the exact location of an incident together with other, possibly contributing, circumstances,” says the canned quote from plod.

“This information is then used by the Department of Transport and Transport for London to help identify potential improvements to road layouts in order to prevent further collisions"

Back in 1985 the Greater London Council understood that knowing where accidents were occurring was key to reducing them, and set about creating a geographical information system to log and track accident figures gathered by the Local Authorities.

The GLC didn't much hold with outsourcing, or private enterprise in general, so the in-house team created the charmingly named "Accstats" system. This ran entirely on PCs when competing systems required more serious (and expensive) computing power.

When the GLC was dismantled the IT operation was sold off, and in 1992 the GIS bit broke off into a separate company and has been selling software and services to local governments, police and fire services ever since.

The first system required local authorities to manually enter the details of every accident onto a dedicated PC. Data was aggregated monthly and the resulting analysis was apparently used to cut accidents by 30 per cent. Mapping can't take all the credit, as serious-accident rates have dropped across the UK thanks to better training, better roads and better vehicles, but London has an enviable record with only 159 road deaths in London during 2011.

These days the Metropolitan Police takes responsibility for gathering, and analysing, the data, as they already have records of every serious accident.

To reduce that number further a 70-point plan was published last November (pdf, long and largely obvious) including such options as removing roadside railings - which makes drivers nervous of hitting pedestrians - and getting cycle shops to hand out safety leaflets.

Establishing what methods are needed, and where they do - or don't - cut accident death rates still needs GIS at the back office level, though, which is where GGP Systems comes in. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.