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P2P badboys The Pirate Bay kicked out of Greenland: Took under 48 hours

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The Pirate Bay has been torpedoed after telecoms companies from two countries blocked the website’s dual domains.

The world’s largest file-sharing site moved a Swedish .se domain to a Greenland-based .gl address between late Monday night and early Tuesday morning after apparently being tipped off that the Swedes were planning to seize their current domain.

Both the Swedish and Greenlandic sites were temporarily down on Thursday morning, but the .se site appears to be back online at the time of writing.

Twitter user David Neal was devastated when he was unable to break copyright before breakfast, and tweeted: “The Pirate Bay isn't loading - time to cry.”

Another user was so angry she resorted to writing IN BLOCK CAPITALS:

Greenlandic telecoms company Tele-Post - the firm which oversees .GL registrations - fired a broadside at The Pirate Bay because it was concerned the domain name would be put to “illegal” uses.

TPB had hoped that when it registered itself in the tiny country - an autonomous constituent of Denmark with a population of just 57,000 people - it would finally have a safe home. Its new host had other plans, though.

“Tele-Post has today decided to block access to two domains operated by file-sharing network The Pirate Bay,” the company said in a statement.

“We observed Tuesday that the domains had been activated and therefore immediately contacted our lawyer.”

The Pirate Bay has spent years moving out of Sweden, the country in which it first dropped anchor. Most of its services are currently cloud-based. The only major links between Sweden and The Pirate Bay were the .se domain name and the support of the Pirate Party in the Scandinavian nation.

Now, the future of TPB looks far from certain. Captains of the site claimed they had dozens of domain names in reserve, just in case their primary ones were pulled down again. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

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