Feeds

Microsoft's developer conference sells out at $2,095 per head

But get on the waitlist and you could still get lucky

Security for virtualized datacentres

Proving that you don't have to be Google to generate frenzied hype around an otherwise staid and – to the layman – obscure tech event, Microsoft has announced that tickets for its annual Build developer conference have sold out.

Microsoft's frenzy didn't quite match Google's, however. This year's Google I/O show sold out in less than an hour. It took Microsoft two days to fill all of the seats at its event.

Build 2013 is set to take place from June 26 to 28 at San Francisco's Moscone Center – the same venue Google uses for its event – which will mark the first time Redmond has held a major developer event in the Bay Area since its Professional Developers Conference in 1996.

The location is a big improvement over last year's Build. Last time, Microsoft cheaped out and held the event at its Redmond campus in November. Attendees had to suffer the interminable drizzle of autumn in Washington while they waited for buses to shuttle them between keynotes and breakout sessions, which were held in two buildings located a mile apart from each other.

You can't really blame Microsoft for wanting to save some coin, though. All 2,000-plus attendees of Build 2012 received a 32GB Surface RT and a Nokia Lumia 920 smartphone running Windows 8, which surely drove up costs.

Tickets for Build 2013 were going for an eye-watering $2,095 – or $1,595 if you were lucky enough to be one of the first 500 to register – so it's entirely possible that Microsoft is planning a similar goodie-bag giveaway for this year's conference. If it is, though, no one is saying what will be in it.

So far, the most highly anticipated announcement of the event is expected to be about software, rather than hardware. It's believed Microsoft plans to use the conference to debut a preview version of its new Windows update pack, codenamed "Blue" and to be known as Windows 8.1 when it ships.

Redmond hasn't even fessed up to that yet, though. All Microsoft corporate VP of developer & platform evangelism Steve Guggenheimer had to say about it in March was:

At Build, we'll share updates and talk about what's next for Windows, Windows Server, Windows Azure, Visual Studio and more. Build is the path to creating and implementing your great ideas, and then differentiating them in the market.

Few surprises there.

One thing that is a little odd about Build 2013, however, is its timing. The conference will overlap all but one day of Microsoft's TechEd Europe 2013, set to take place in Madrid, Spain, which also features content for enterprise developers. How much overlap there will be between the two shows' programming is unclear.

Assuming you weren't able to secure a ticket for Build 2013 – and let's face it, that's a fairly safe assumption – you have two options. First, you can sign up for the waiting list and hope that additional seats open up before the event.

Failing that, or if you don't expect to have $2,095 lying around when your number is called, you can watch the conference programming online. Microsoft says it plans to broadcast live streams of Build keynotes, sessions, and Channel 9 talks. More information will be revealed on the Build website as the conference approaches. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Managing SSL certificates with ease
The lack of operational efficiencies and compliance pitfalls associated with poor SSL certificate management, and how the right SSL certificate management tool can help.