Feeds

Brits, Germans, French, Dutch, Spanish and Italians ALL to probe Google

Six nations pull out microscopes, eye ad giant's ass

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Google faces possible legal action from six different data protection regulators in Europe - including the British Information Commissioner - after the advertising giant failed to comply with an order to make changes to its privacy policy.

France's Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL), which was tasked by Brussels' Article 29 Working Party with investigating Google's controversial privacy policy changes in March 2012, said today that the company had not implemented any "significant compliance measures."

The UK's ICO, meanwhile, confirmed to The Register this morning that it had launched a fresh probe into Google.

This time the UK watchdog is mulling whether the company's decision to revise its privacy policy last year by consolidating 70 different policies into one terms-of-service document has violated UK data protection law. It told us:

The action follows an initial investigation by the French data protection authority CNIL, on behalf of the Article 29 group of which the ICO is a member.

Several data protection authorities across Europe are now considering whether the policy is compliant with their own national legislation. As this is an ongoing investigation it would not be appropriate to comment further.

France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain are the five other EU countries whose data watchdogs are now investigating Google. Officials from the six nations involved in the action met with representatives from the world's largest ad broker on 19 March, CNIL said.

"Following this meeting, no change has been seen," the regulator's reps added. The statement continued:

The article 29 working party’s analysis is finalised. It is now up to each national data protection authority to carry out further investigations according to the provisions of its national law transposing European legislation.

Consequently, all the authorities composing the taskforce have launched actions on 2 April 2013 on the basis of the provisions laid down in their respective national legislation (investigations, inspections, etc.)

In particular, the CNIL notified Google of the initiation of an inspection procedure and that it had set up an international administrative cooperation procedure with its counterparts in the taskforce.

Just days before Google debuted its new terms of service in March last year, the article 29 working group - which is vice-chaired by Blighty's Information Commissioner, Christopher Graham - warned Google that its new policy did not meet the requirements of the European Directive on Data Protection.

Google, however, went ahead and revised its policy on 1 March 2012. The ads colossus had not got back to El Reg with any comment at time of writing. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Managing SSL certificates with ease
The lack of operational efficiencies and compliance pitfalls associated with poor SSL certificate management, and how the right SSL certificate management tool can help.