Feeds

Oz states count cars using Bluetooth

Traffic studies bring out tinfoil hats

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The government of Australia's Capital Territory (ACT) has issued a statement about the use of Bluetooth-sniffing technology for traffic studies.

The issue arose as the result of grassroots activism from Canberra-centric news service The-RiotACT, which has its take on events here.

RiotACT considers the Bluetooth collection to be analogous to Google's StreetView data slurp in which the Chocolate Factory decided that open WiFi access points were fair game for data sniffs. The organisation goes so far as to accuse the ACT government's Territory and Municipal Services – the agency in charge of roads and therefore running the traffic studies – of breaching Australia's Telecommunications Interception Act.

TAMS has responded that its activities are nothing nefarious and that it doesn't collect “personally identifiable” information. In this brief statement, the agency says Bluetooth provides a useful gauge of travel times and route decisions. The agency says the technology is in use “around Australia”, although El Reg was only able to document this for NSW.

While RiotACT's reaction seems overblown, The Register wonders whether recent research into how easily “anonymous” movement data can be tied to an individual would have privacy implications in this setting.

Bluetooth traffic technology doesn't attempt to capture communication data from passing devices, but merely records a “signature” (most probably the device ID, MAC address or name offered over the link) as a car enters and leaves the footprint of the measuring device. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Knock Knock tool makes a joke of Mac AV
Yes, we know Macs 'don't get viruses', but when they do this code'll spot 'em
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Why weasel words might not work for Whisper
CEO suspends editor but privacy questions remain
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
BlackEnergy crimeware coursing through US control systems
US CERT says three flavours of control kit are under attack
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.