Feeds

Torygraph and Currant Bun stand by to repel freeloaders

It's a paywall - like the one at the grocer

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Boost IT visibility and business value

The Daily Telegraph is to begin charging regular web readers for web access.

The Telegraph doesn't use the term 'paywall' in its announcement, which is fair enough, really. The P-word is really a propaganda word, as the FT's M B Christie has pointed out: "Why don't we call it paying for content, just like paying for milk or bread?"

Because information wants to be free, man - and we'll scream and stamp our little feet on Twitter all day unless we get everything for free.

Payw- er, digital subscriptions are actually becoming the norm for newspapers, rather than the exception. Two thirds of newspapers Stateside charge for online access, and the Washington Post became the biggest to introduce digital subs for regulars. The average number of articles permitted to non-subscribers is 11.2. And the trend to repelling freeloaders is accelerating.

The Telegraph will permit 20 articles, then ask for £1.99 a month - less than the cost of two editions of the paper Telegraph. To read the fondleslab edition, you'll need to pay £9.99 a month.

There is one flaw in this brilliant plan. The Telegraph's iPad app is consistently the most buggy and the least reliable of all the UK newspaper apps, and lies in abject, barely-supported neglect. It's actually so bad, they should be paying their loyal readers to install it. Or at least reverse the subscription tiers, so it's £9.99 for web access, but with an £8 inconvenience discount for users of the iPad version.

Don't believe me? Check out the reviews.

The Sun will be following suit later in the year, according to News International's boss Mike Darcey. The tariffs for the web and fondleslab editions of the Current Bun haven't yet been disclosed.

Many tech media experts and Cory Doctorow ridiculed the notion of charging for access when The New York Times imposed its subscription scheme two years ago.

A canny subscription program saw both paper and digital revenues rise

But who's laughing now? ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?