Feeds

Free speechers want into Apple and Samsung sealed court filings

Want everything but the formula for Coke, complains beak

High performance access to file storage

A coalition of media and free speech advocates have tried to convince a US court that sealed documents in Apple and Samsung's patent smackdown should be made public.

The group, which includes news outlets like the New York Times and Bloomberg along with nonprofits like the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, told the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals that folks need to know what's in the closed documents so they can understand the judicial process and why one of the tech companies will ultimately win the litigation.

But the three-judge panel said it was worried that the definition of what constitutes trade secrets was being taken too narrowly while the group promotes a sweeping definition of public interest.

"You really seem to be saying that a trade secret is the formula for Coke and not much else," said Judge William Bryson, according to Reuters.

"If there are investors out there who are very interested in the [sealed financial data], are they part of the public interest?" he asked.

District Judge Lucy Koh allowed Apple and Samsung to keep source code and details of patent licensing deals under wraps along with some other financial information, but ordered them to out other data they wanted kept secret. Those orders are on hold pending the appeal court's decision.

If the court forces the warring firms to reveal their secrets, the decision could set a precedent for intellectual property cases, where companies tend to try to file under seal as a rule rather than an exception.

Apple and Samsung are arguing that forcing companies to give up all their financial data will stop them from getting the courts' protection for their patents. However, both firms cut down the list of documents they wanted kept sealed after the appeals court allowed the media group to present oral arguments. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.