Feeds

Chinese graves use quick response codes to recall the dead

Scan for more info on your loved ones

High performance access to file storage

Japan’s reputation as a global technology trend setter has received some rather unlikely validation: after graves in the country started sporting QR codes, the little squares of encoded data have now appeared in cemeteries in China. The codes are placed to provide links to information about the deceased.

In Japan, adding QR codes to headstones is apparently known as kuyou no mado or “memorial service window”.

The idea is that visitors to the gravestone can find out more on the person six feet under, thanks to photos, videos and other commemorative content uploaded by friends and family.

Now, media reports in China (via Sinocism) say that more than 10 people have applied for the service for their departed loved ones at the Shengjing cemetery in Shenyang, capital of north-east Liaoning province in China.

It’s certainly one of the more unusual uses for the near-ubiquitous codes, which were invented back in the mid-1990s in Japan but surged in popularity over the past few years with the growth in smartphone devices loaded with QR reader apps.

Although mainly used to peddle disappointing marketing content, a few notable exceptions have shown QR codes in a kinder light.

Also in China, for example, retailer Yihaodian is planning to launch a series of supermarkets nationwide which don’t actually contain any food, but merely pictures of items to order for home delivery by scanning their QR code.

In Turkey, meanwhile, Istanbul ad agency BÜRO incorporated the code into an innovative newspaper advert for its client – a tattoo parlour.

Candidates keen to work there were encouraged to ink in a blank QR code which, if completed accurately and scanned would take them to an online application form – whilst simultaneously providing the initial screening process. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.