Feeds

Google patent filing suggests Glass will be ULTIMATE REMOTE

Headset computing to control your life

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Google's Project Glass computing specs could solve one of technology's most enduring problems – finding where you put the remote control.

A patent filing from the Chocolate Factory shows that the firm wants to build control of everyday objects into its head-mounted hardware so that the wearer can use voice commands to order about other systems and get the know-how to use them when needed.

"A wearable computing device may facilitate the wearer's operation of or understanding of a particular device, described herein as a 'target device,' that is located in the wearer's environment," reads US patent application 20130069985, "Wearable Computer with Superimposed Controls and Instructions for External Device".

"The target device could be any electrical, optical, or mechanical device. For example, the target device could be a home appliance, such as a refrigerator, espresso maker, television, garage door, alarm system, indoor or outdoor lighting system, or an office appliance, such as a copy machine."

One example given is linking the glasses into an office printer. If the printer runs out of paper, the glasses will project an alert on the viewing eyepiece and then guide the wearer through the process of adding more in the correct tray. Similar heads-up displays could be used for a range of functions, possibly displayed on the glasses themselves or on other objects, using lasers built into the spectacles.

Mountain View has set a price of $1,500 for first glasses (although one enterprising eBayer receiving offers of ten times that sum before the auction was pulled), and is expected to announce availability of the hardware at this year's sold-out Google I/O developer conference.

That's a lot of money for a glorified remote control.

Google's been promising the Glass spectacles for nearly a year, and Sergey Brin is seldom seen in public without a pair these days. This patent filing adds more functions to glasses that are already being touted as having the ability to recognize people by their clothing style and which may "end privacy as we know it." ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.