Feeds

Schmidt calls China's attempts to take over internet 'egregious'

After all, that's Google's job

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt has told an audience in India that China is the worst example of a nation trying to take over and censor the internet.

"As the internet has emerged in many of these different countries, there's quite a few countries that have no laws that pertain to the internet at all and those internets tend to be free and open with almost anything goes," he told the Big Tent Activate Summit in New Delhi, The Guardian reports.

"There are other governments that try very dramatically to censor or control the internet, with China being the most egregious example."

He highlighted the recent hacking attack on The New York Times, which has been linked to Chinese hackers, and said that if information gleaned from it was used to identify dissidents speaking against the government then those people would end up in a prison camp.

"These are some of the problems that happen when everyone's connected ... My point here is that this [ability to intrude on privacy] is going to happen because the value of the internet is so profound and positive, but we've got to recognize the issues and get ahead of it by discussion."

According to Schmidt his recent visit to North Korea was all about trying to open that country up to the internet. He is also due to visit the military junta in Myanmar with a similar message, although given that regime's predilections for repressing its citizens he's likely to get a cold shoulder.

Some might say that Schmidt is hardly the best person to be lecturing about privacy. He famously blew a fuse and banned one publication from Google events after it used the Chocolate Factory's search engine to find and publish lots of his personal data.

Over his Google career he has also suggested people troubled by Streetview should just move house (although later retracted that), that people only worry about privacy if they've done something wrong, and his chilling "We know where you are. We know where you've been. We can more or less know what you're thinking about," comment.

While it's good to have internet privacy on the agenda, this El Reg hack would like a slightly more reliable champion, please. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.