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Reader slain? 'Even the Google apologists on G+ are p****d off'

Plus: 'How many more hours are your servers going to be down?'

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Quotw This was the week in which the internet discovered that, astonishingly, everybody on the planet is a fan of Google Reader after Google announced it was switching off the service because no one wanted it. At least, it seemed everybody is a fan of it, judging by the outpouring of rage across the web at the news.

The Chocolate Factory decided to do some spring cleaning of its products and axed the RSS-collating Reader service. Google said this was why:

There are two simple reasons for this: usage of Google Reader has declined, and as a company we’re pouring all of our energy into fewer products. We think that kind of focus will make for a better user experience.

Despite this alleged drop in use, the internet promptly imploded under the weight of its own fury. A Change.org petition urging the company to change its mind got nearly 57,000 signatures in under 24 hours and the White House had to remove a citizen-submitted petition from its website that called on President Barack Obama to step in because it violates their T&Cs on commercial interests.

And Twitter users weren't so sure that Google's reasons were as simple as all that. One tweeted:

Shutdown of Google Reader because of a 'lack of consumer appeal?' No way. The simple reason: RSS can't be controlled and monetized easily.

And another said:

You know how bad the Google Reader outrage is? Even the Google apologists on G+ are pissed. I’ve only seen a handful of Google defenders.

Microsoft was also in trouble this week when its shiny new Outlook.com and ancient Hotmail services went down and didn't get back up again. The outage lasted at least 16 hours, as Redmond admitted that the problem wasn't going away as easily as it hoped:

We apologise for the length interruption in service.

Needless to say, users were not kind on Twitter:

How many more hours are your servers going to be down? RIDICULOUS.

And:

Wow, Microsoft. Yet again #hotmail is down...You're making the decision about whether to switch fully to gmail or not very easy.

The US court was on Apple's case over its tardy approach to pulling out paperwork requested by people suing the iPhone maker. Judge Magistrate Paul Grewal has ordered the company to lay out in great detail just what it is doing to find these bits of paper, saying:

Apple waited over three months from this court's order requiring it to produce responsive documents to actually check whether it had done so. This is unacceptable.

Luckily for plaintiffs, Apple has provided more than enough evidence itself to suggest to the court that it has not fully complied with the court's order.

In light of Apple's performance in this case, the court cannot rely on its representations that this time it really has or will produce all responsive documents.

Here in Blighty, mobe users are being forced to pay roaming fees for calls and messages when they stray too close to the White Cliffs of Dover and automatically switch to a French network. The scenic tourist attractions apparently block out Brit phone network signals, leaving nothing but French airwaves behind. A ticked off resident told the Daily Mail:

You switch on your phone and it says, 'Welcome to France'. I avoid the cliff area now because of the problem.

Everyone has good cause to be angry about it and something needs to be done. Visitors to the area are unaware of it and are shocked when their bills come in.

And finally, a Seattle bar has issued a preemptive and colourful ban of Google Glass specs to help its customers keep their patronage of the joint a secret. The pub said on its Facebook page:

The 5 Point is the first Seattle business to ban in advance Google Glasses. And ass kickings will be encouraged for violators.

And the reason why? According to the owner Dave Meinert:

You have to understand the culture of The 5 Point which is a sometimes seedy, maybe notorious place and I think people want to go there and be not known. We don't let people film other people or take photos unwanted of other people in the bar because it's kind of a private place people go.

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