Feeds

NORKS says USA attack took it offline ... as if anyone could tell

US blamed for 'despicable and base acts' on its interwebs

New hybrid storage solutions

North Korea is warning that the US and its allies “should be held wholly accountable” after claiming that a massive cyber attack has taken the country offline over the past two days, despite virtually no one in the secretive state being allowed on the interwebs.

The axis of evil state’s Korean Central News Agency blamed the US, in typically understated fashion, for “very disturbing developments” and “despicable and base acts” upon its internet infrastructure, for which its enemies will suffer “ensuing consequences”, according to the North Korea Tech blog.

It added the following:

Intensive and persistent virus attacks are being made every day on internet servers operated by the DPRK… The DPRK will never remain a passive onlooker to the enemies’ cyber attacks that have reached a very grave phase as part of their moves to stifle it. It is ridiculous, indeed, for the hostile forces to mount such virus attacks on the DPRK’s internet servers, much upset by the all-out action of its army and people to defend the sovereignty of the country and the nation.

Ironically enough, the majority of the nation's citizens aren’t even allowed to access the world wide web, so even if a widespread cyber attack has taken the country offline, only “elite” members of society, as well as a select group of academics and scientists, would be affected.

A swipe at a few web servers is not, therefore, a major disruption to the life of most North Koreans.

The country has had a restricted 3G network since 2008, run by Egyptian/North Korean JV Koryolink, wireless data connectivity was only switched on last month, for foreigners, tourists and presumably former NBA stars.

This has led to some interesting tweets and Instagram snaps from the handful of foreigners in the reclusive state, but such connectivity options are beyond the wildest dreams of most proles there.

Still, there is hope that supreme leader Kim Jong-un may be more tech-savvy than his presidential predecessors, and therefore perhaps more inclined to relax internet restrictions. He was snapped last month, for example, with what appeared to be an HTC smartphone at his side. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Italy's High Court orders HP to refund punter for putting Windows on PC
Top beaks slam bundled OS as 'commercial policy of forced distribution'
Net neutrality protestors slam the brakes on their OWN websites
Sites link up to protest slow lanes by bogging down pages
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Uber alles-holes, claims lawsuit: Taxi biz sued by blind passengers
Sueball claims blind passengers ditched, guide dogs abused
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.