Feeds

Microsoft unveils even more tempting Kinect offering: Open source

This has people up in arms, in a good way

Security for virtualized datacentres

First it was developer tools, then Kinect for the PC, now Microsoft's given hackers a shot at the Kinect code under an open-source license.

Specifically, Redmond has now released samples of the Kinect code under an Apache license to serve as a template for hackers building apps for the hands-free motion controller that's been proving so alluring to techies across many sectors.

Samples cover audio, colour, depth, face tracking, infrared, shapes, skeletal viewers, gestures and speech basics and are available in a variety of C#, C++, Visual Basic and DirectX.

You'll need the SDK and Microsoft toolkit to work with the samples.

Microsoft's released code to enable faster uptake, so you don't need to bother downloading and installing the full developer toolkit if all you want is just a few pieces.

Why? Microsoft wants feedback from the community on how to improve the samples, and - therefore - the Kinect code.

Code's been released to Microsoft's open source project hosting side CodePlex with a Git repository to permit cloning and forking.

Kinect's success has surpassed Microsoft's expectations. When Microsoft released the device in November 2010, it was simply as a hands-free motion-sensing alternative Xbox controller.

The Kinect won a Guinness World Record for fastest selling consumer electronics device: and now hackers have gone well beyond games to re-deploy Kinect hardware - as seen here. Microsoft's own researchers are using the Kinect's 3D camera too, in experiments to attempt to construct Star Trek-style holodecks and Minority Report-esque 3D touch-displays.

Open sourcers also got in on the act, with a race to build Kinect drivers for Linux shortly after launch.

Microsoft responded by making Kinect easier to access. It's released a Kinect sensor for PC, SDKs to build non commercial and commercial apps for the PC, and firmware updates to permit use of the controller at distances closer than the usual sitting-room gaming range. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Tim Cook: The classic iPod HAD to DIE, and this is WHY
Apple, er, couldn’t get the parts for HDD models
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
ICO warns UK broadcasters over filming using drones
Must comply with data protection rules, m'kay?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.