Feeds

ITU approaches Asia-Pac nations to support new ITRs

Still seeking allies for an unloved treaty

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The ITU has reportedly sent a senior official to Bangkok to try and win votes for the new International Telecommunications Regulations which were proposed, argued over and ultimately voted down in December.

According to CommsDay, the official is Malcolm Johnson, head of the ITU Telecommunications Standardization Bureau, pursuing a brief to persuade some of last year's dissenters that criticisms of the proposed ITRs were off-track.

December's confab in Dubai became acrimonious over whether or not proposed clauses in the ITRs amounted to a carte blanche for governments to regulate the Internet (something The Register seems to recall documenting even without ITRs, with links frequently cut in in the Syrian conflict, Iran blocking access to overseas-hosted VPN services ahead of its upcoming elections, a number of countries proposing or implementing data retention regimes, the “great firewall” in China which somehow manages to be porous to malicious traffic, ill-applied defamation laws and so on).

Johnson appears to have reiterated an ITU position that has been stated before, that the regulations don't represent an ITU takeover of Internet regulation, something that's still treated with scepticism by the 55 roughly US-aligned dissenting countries. The “pro-regulation” group that included Russia, China and a number of Arabic nations also sought to delegate to individual nations the right to manage network naming and numbering.

In an interesting development, CommsDay also reports speculation that no consensus emerges for a form of words, the ITU may try to incorporate the ITRs as administrative regulations under a revised ITU constitution, making acceptance of the regulations a pre-requisite to membership. If this were to happen, it would take place at the 2014 plenipotentiary in South Korea, leaving plenty of time for an acrimonious year of lobbying. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.