Feeds

Amazon slashes DynamoDB prices

NoSQL flash-backed database gets cheaper

Boost IT visibility and business value

Amazon has slashed the cost of DynamoDB as the cloud giant passes on operational savings to customers.

The price cut was announced by Amazon on Thursday, and sees dramatic reductions in provisioned throughput costs, along with the price of indexed storage.

"Rapid adoption has allowed us to benefit from the scale economies inherent in our architecture," Amazon CTO Werner Vogels wrote in a blog post.

"We have also reduced our underlying costs through significant technical innovations from our engineering team. I'm thrilled that we're are able [sic] to pass along these cost savings to our customers in the form of significantly lower prices – as much as 85% lower than before."

As is usual, the price cuts vary according to which data center developers are running the service from, with Amazon's huge Oregon and Northern Virginia facilities costing the least in terms of throughput, and Sao Paulo the most.

All prices for throughput have dropped to less than a cent per 10 write or 50 read units per hour. Indexed storage prices have fallen as well, and have fallen along roughly the same lines.

The price cut came into force on March 1.

Amazon is also starting to sell DynamoDB Reserved Capacity, which lets customers get a major discount on the cost of the database if they pay for it in advance.

This reflects both Amazon's scale and its retail mentality, with Bezos & Co.'s cloud pricing their cloud services as you would a commodity, rather than typical enterprise tech.*

Amazon has been able to reduce the prices so much through a combination of savings from buying data center gear in bulk, and optimizing DynamoDB's software program, Vogels wrote.

The NoSQL database lives on SSD-backed servers and offers developers a technology that is scalable.

DynamoDB was launched in January 2012, but had been used internally at Amazon for a number of years. The company published a paper describing the technology in 2007, and this led to the popular Cassandra and Riak open source databases.

DynamoDB has a 64KB object-size limit, and can only replicate data between separate availability zones within an AWS geographical region, rather than offering true global redundancy, as Google enjoys with Spanner or enterprise customers can get with TransLattice or, for that matter, Riak Enterprise. ®

*Bootnote

Amazon's pricing strategy has ruffled the feathers of traditional OEMs, causing VMware executives to indulge in a bout of Wagnerian introspection at Amazon's success. The consistent reduction in pricing for its services has also sparked a cloudy price war among it, Microsoft, and Google – good for developers, but sure to cut into profit margins at all the major cloud companies.

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.