Feeds

Amazon accused of knocking off AWS customers' products

Partners: Cloud kingpin playing the copycat game

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Some AWS partners get a raw deal

Amazon has a duty to make money for its shareholders, so its expansion into other areas is not surprising. But from The Reg's point of view, some of Amazon's technology partners are getting a raw deal.

For one thing, partners do not receive notifications of Amazon's plans to create knock-offs of their own products, The Reg has learned.

In addition, even after producing a knock-off, Amazon representatives pump their partners for information about how they can improve the product, we've been told.

"After sharing with them twice what we do and seeing what we showed them show up totally copied by them, I think this time I will respectfully pass on the pleasure," Newvem's Laderman told us via email after he had received another request for information from Amazon following the launch of Trusted Advisor.

When Amazon started offering rentable compute and storage services in 2006, it was clear that Bezos had big plans for the division. But as it has come to dominate the basic infrastructure-as-a-service market, the company has sought to expand its platform with new services.

This had led to a Cambrian explosion in the number of companies that either sit directly on AWS – Heroku, for example – or that produce services made possible by AWS technologies – such as Zencoder.

This growth has provided Amazon with the twin benefits of locking customers into its platform by encouraging them to code applications for some of AWS's less-commoditized technologies, and of giving Bezos & Co. a verdant third-party ecosystem to pick through for inspiration for future AWS services.

"Amazon wants to get you and any other cloud vendor to couple to their infrastructure," Concurrent's Wensel tells us.

Just how high up the stack Amazon will go remains to be seen, but right now its partners are nervous, and some of them feel that they are paying for the privilege of having their products inspire new AWS services.

"The official AWS line is that they don't want be any higher up the stack than they already are. But this line has moved in the past, and it may move in the future," Zencoder's Dahl says. "Anyone building API utilities needs to take this into account."

When The Register contacted Amazon for a statement, a spokeswoman for the Seattle cloud giant wrote:

We want to give our customers a lot of options for how they deploy and build their applications, from both AWS services and our growing partner ecosystem. ... Customers should be able to choose the right solution for them based on their business and technical requirements. We're constantly building new AWS services and adding new features that make it easier for businesses to use our services. At the same time, we continue to invest in growing our partner eco-system, so ultimately customers have choice and flexibility in how they build and deploy their applications on AWS.

If you read between the lines of the statement, it sounds like Amazon will keep building, and partners will need to keep running up the stack away from the wave of commoditization flowing forth from Amazon. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Bitcasa bins $10-a-month Infinite storage offer
Firm cites 'low demand' plus 'abusers'
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.