Feeds

Viv Reding attacks 'scaremongers' opposing her draft Data Protection bill

Growls at lobbyists for attempts to pour water on directive

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

US technology companies who have being lobbying hard against Viviane Reding's proposed reform of the European Union's data protection law were criticised today by the Brussels' justice commissioner for deploying "scaremongering" tactics.

Her bill, meanwhile, has been savaged by at least nine member states - according to the Financial Times - after countries including Britain successfully argued that the proposed directive was too rigid and cumbersome for businesses operating within the 27 members' state bloc.

A memo drafted by the Irish presidency of the EU and seen by the pink'un appeared to show a deep level of opposition from a number of countries. It said:

Several member states have voiced their disagreement with the level of prescriptiveness of a number of the proposed obligations in the draft regulation.

The newspaper also cited an unnamed EU diplomat who claimed that there was a consensus among many of the nations that the rewrite of Europe's DP law needed to cut down the "burdens" contained within the regulation.

Reding has been pushing for a single law with which every member state will need to comply even though the national governments currently have a patchwork quilt approach to current EU data protection legislation.

The commissioner, in a clear attack on critics of her bill, said today that the discussions about consent were "overblown". She snarled:

The current directive states since 1995 that consent has to be "unambiguous". The commission thinks it should be "explicit". 27 national Data Protection Authorities agree.

What will this mean in practice? That explicit consent will be needed in all circumstances? Hundreds of pop-ups on your screens? Smartphones thrown on the floor in frustration?

No. It means none of these things. This is only the scaremongering of certain lobbyists.

Reding added that the fundamentals of the Data Protection law would not be ripped apart and said that it was simply the case that the current legislation needed to be refreshed.

She warned: "If your business model is in line with the current rules, you have nothing to fear. Things are fine if you comply."

However, the bill in its current form looks set to be trampled on. Here in Britain, the government has long complained that Reding's proposals were unworkable.

In November last year, the House of Commons Justice Select Committee blasted the directive. It said that while data protection law in the EU needed a shakeup some of the plans "do not allow for flexibility or discretion for businesses or other organisations which hold personal data, or for data protection authorities".

The draft bill is currently being scrutinised by the European Parliament. Privacy groups recently raised concerns about how the proposed law was being picked apart and amended by some MEPs. They also warned that lobbyists from big tech outfits had too much power in Brussels. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
DVLA website GOES TITSUP on day paper car tax discs retire
Welcome to GOV.UK - digital by de ... FAULT
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.