Feeds

Heavenly networker Pertino pockets $20m to take on Cisco Meraki

Cloud Network Engine powers up for epic battle

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

If you want to take on Cisco Systems in the nascent cloud networking-as-a-service market, you are going to need money. Lots of money. And so plucky upstart Pertino Networks, which just uncloaked from stealth mode last month, has gathered up some new investors and hit up its existing ones to fill up its war chest.

Todd Krautkremer, vice president of marketing at Pertino, tells El Reg that some of the existing seed investors kicked in to the $20m in Series B funding, and so did Norwest Venture Partners and Lightspeed Venture Partners, which put together $8.9m in Series A funding back in April 2012 for Pertino to fuel up the Cloud Network Engine.

But the lead investor on the Series B round was Jafco Ventures, which among other things invested in Aster Data (now part of Teradata) and DataAllegro (now part of Microsoft). Having Jafco kick in funds is important, explained Krautkremer, because the company has relationships in Japan and China, where Pertino hopes to expand its business.

Krautkremer says that Pertino is putting its hand into the money bag a little earlier than it planned. but it is doing so for a number of reasons. First, Cloud Network Engine just launched with limited availability last month, and a product launch is the natural time to round up a bunch more investors.

Second, with Cloud Network Engine being both a cloudy product and a software-defined networking product, there are lots of VCs and equity firms running around trying to find someone to give money to.

"We foresee these funds as being able to take us a very long way down the road towards – if not all the way to – profitability," Krautkremer said.

Conceptual view of the Pertino cloud network engine

Conceptual view of the Pertino cloud network engine

As El Reg explained last month when Pertino uncloaked, Cloud Network Engine is a service that abstracts all of the LAN and WAN links between our devices (smartphones, laptops, PCs, and tablets) and the applications running on servers inside the corporate firewall.

You have an email address as an identifier, a bunch of different devices that you are allowed to work from, and a bunch of apps and services that you are allowed to link to, and Pertino takes care of all of the networking gobbledygook in between, creating what it calls a "personal address space" on the cloud that is functionally a personal cloudy network between you and your apps.

You can overlay these personal cloud nets into aggregated corporate address spaces, and the Cloud Network Engine can support up to 64,000 combinations of users and devices, so it is plenty scalable.

Like other SDN approaches, Cloud Network Engine is separating the control plane from the forwarding or data plane, allowing for traffic shaping, WAN optimization, and other services across the Pertino cloud.

Cloud Network Engine currently runs on Amazon Web Services, Rackspace Cloud, Linode, and a few other cloud providers. Pertino has multiple carrier feeds between these clouds to pass data between them as you link in from different parts of the world to access your apps on the corporate physical LAN inside the firewall.

Eventually, Pertino will link Cloud Network Engine into LDAP and Active Directory access control software and will support links from other operating systems. OS X support is coming in April, and other operating systems (including iOS and Android) and additional network services will be rolling out in the second half of the year. General availability for Cloud Network Engine is expected in the fourth quarter.

During limited availability, you can try out Cloud Network Engine for free for three different users with up to three devices each. If you want more people to access a device or service inside of the corporate firewall, then you pay $10 per member (as Pertino calls users) per month.

In the past month, Pertino has added five employees and now has 35 people on staff. It has also boosted its customer base from 250 before it uncloaked to over 800. That's pretty good for a product that at the moment only supports PCs running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2.

Cisco, of course, shelled out $1.2bn for Meraki, which has created a cloudy network service to layer on top of WiFi and wired networks, and has said that it wants to create a $1bn Cloud Networking Group based on Meraki's hardware and software technology. Expect others to dive in and try to grab big handfuls of money and start talking about cloudy networks or using the cloud as a big virtual switch. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.