Feeds

Penguins, only YOU can turn desktop disk IO into legacy tech

In-memory desktop computing could be a win for some sharp-eyed Linux firm

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Blocks and Files With the advent of flash-based storage memory, the prospect of banishing disk IO waits forever from transaction-based or other IO-bound server applications is close to becoming a reality. But what about desktops?

We have a pretty weak example with Apple's MacBook Air ultrathin laptops, but these are underpowered little lovelies, trading off faster-than-disk flash memory access for weak CPUs. A Fusion drive iMac, the one with a disk and separate slab of flash for hot data, seems faster and much more powerful, but really it is just nibbling at the edges.

I don't want just instant boot and faster app load. I want my desktop PC to silently scream along, I want it to be faster than the speed of light. I want to hit a key to fire up Quark Express, that bastard of a big, complex app, and have it ready to run in microseconds.

And I can have it... I know I can have it. Just load the big clumping load of Quark code into storage memory and that's it - ready to rock 'n' roll at a the press of a key.

I want the apps in storage memory (flash) - which the apps will simply treat as extended real memory - and have the operating system treat app data IOs as memory-level access operations. There'd be no need for that treacle-slow traversing of old legacy IO subsystems. Enough already.

Listen, system and OS designers, we all know it: disk IO sucks.

Microsoft with its wobbly Windows OS has done it. Redmond, with its crapware and bloated code, has made a modern disk-based PC about as fast as an old tape-driven mini-computer. I mean, come on, surely it can do better than this.

I want a storage-memory-based desktop with an OS that's lightweight in the IO department. I want a screaming fast PC and the tech is there to build it. Microsoft won't do it, it seems to have lost the PC performance plot, condemned by its legacy Windows mindset.

So come on Linux startups, feel the Fusion-io storage memory love and try to cobble something together. Give the world a Linux storage memory-using OS that takes a vanilla PC, adds a slab of PCIe flash and turns it into a workstation of wonder, a desktop of desire, a paradisaical PC, a speed freak's fantasy machine.

Apple couldn't do it, not successfully anyway, and Microsoft doesn't seem to want to - so here's your chance. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
DEATH by COMMENTS: WordPress XSS vuln is BIGGEST for YEARS
Trio of XSS turns attackers into admins
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.