Feeds

Google builds web games using Chrome on mobes as controller

Mutant offspring of Wii U and Daley Thompson’s Decathlon

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Google has released a Chrome Experiment, titled Chrome Super Sync Sports, that turns mobile devices into controllers for games in which the action takes place on a PC’s screen.

The games offer simple running, cycling and swimming variants, none of which are conceptually too far beyond the “mash a button as fast as you can” genre Reg readers may recall from classics like the running events in Daley Thompson’s Decathlon.

While the games aren’t intriguing, the control mechanism is. Users need a device capable of running a mobile version of the ad giant’s Chrome browser. Starting a session sees the PC screen offer a code that, once entered into a Wi-Fi connected mobile device at g.co/super turns that phone or table into a games controller. Players’ first task is to select an avatar, a process that involves using a virtual four-way rocker control on the mobile device to select one of many avatars on the PC’s screen.

The games don’t ask for fine motor skills – the cycling game we played called for us to draw circles with two fingers – and won’t interest even semi-serious gamers for more than a few minutes.

The fact it is possible for up to four players to play against one another does at least make the games a social experience, and a nicely open one given the games need only Chrome rather than insisting on Android.

The experience of syncing a mobile device with the games is simple and there is no perceptible lag between on-mobile actions and on-screen action. Graphics are bright, simple and pose no threat any console.

The games continue Google’s efforts to promote Chrome by showing off games, HTML 5 and alternate interfaces, after it last year offered a series of upper-lip-controlled games in support of Men’s health charity Movember. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display
Shaves price, not screen on mid-2014 model
iPhone 6 flip tip slips in Aussie's clip: Apple's 'reversible USB' leaks
New plug not compatible with official Type-C, according to fresh rumors
FEAST YOUR EYES: Samsung's Galaxy Alpha has an 'entirely new appearance'
Wow, it looks like nothing else on the market, for sure
YES YES YES! Apple patents mousy, pressure-sensing iVibrator
Fanbois prepare to experience the great Cupertin-O
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
TV transport tech, part 1: From server to sofa at the touch of a button
You won't believe how much goes into today's telly tech
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
Things are looking up in Flappy Bird sequel
'Swing Copters' offers the same gameplay but in a different direction
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.