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CloudBees in PaaS THREESOME with Cloud Foundry tie-up

Java cloud caught in VMware love-in seeks 'other relationships' as well

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Promiscuous Java-lover CloudBees has integrated its platform-as-a-service with VMware's Cloud Foundry, giving developers a simple way to use Jenkins continuous integration with VMware's well-developed PaaS.

The love-in means developers can use CloudBees' Jenkins-based Java development tools to perform build-and-test orchestration on their Grails, Spring, and Java projects before deploying onto CloudBees or an alternative PaaS.

Thursday's announcement of Cloud Foundry integration means developers can now choose from three different PaaS's to run on, including the aforementioned CF, along with Google App Engine, and CloudBees' RUN@cloud platform.

But CloudBees is not the only development cloud to have embraced Cloud Foundry – Bezos-backed integration service SkyTap got with CF last August.

What separates CloudBees from other PaaS's and development clouds is its bundling of development features such as Jenkins, making it an attractive online build environment for some developers, paired with its comprehensive support of Spring and Java.

The service's 20,000 or so users typically come to it after spending time implementing their own PaaS-like platform on top of Amazon's infrastructure-as-a-service cloud, the company's chief executive Sacha Labourey told The Register. "It typically takes a developer to ride in IaaS-land before they decide to get productive again," he said.

For this reason, the PaaS has been somewhat promiscuous of late, hooking up with Google App Engine several months ago, Cloud Foundry today, and with its eyes set on others for tomorrow.

When The Register suggested that CloudBees might like to hook-up with Engine Yard or OpenShift as well, Labourey said "we are very open to that type of relationship. We aim to offer choice to our developers, so you will definitivly see us offer integration with other PaaS providers down the road."

The service is available beginning today.

CloudBees is confident that developers won't catch any PaaS-transmitted fails from its love-in: "Cloud Foundry APIs are pretty clean, so we didn't face any big challenge when performing that integration," Labourey assured us. ®

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