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Upstart Aerospoke flings NoSQL ninja star into data-centre rings

Ouch! Right in the topology

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A NoSQL startup is upping its game with a feature update allowing biz types to share data across multiple data centres.

Aerospike has released Enterprise Edition 2.6 with the addition of star topologies. The architecture allows one data centre to simultaneously replicate information to multiple data centres – a move the company claimed makes it the first NoSQL database to implement star topology with complex multi-master ring replication.

The company announced that its customer, online ads shop Federated Media Publishing, uses Aerospike’s NoSQL database to serve impressions to 180 million visitors per month.

Federated Media reckoned Aerospike provides “sub-millisecond latency” for consistent ad-server performance.

Aerospike is a Silicon Valley startup providing a NoSQL Key-Value Store that works natively on native on flash and solid state drives and claims a response time of 1 millisecond for 99 per cent of requests. It’s being used for session management, recommendation engines and as an in-memory database or persistent cache to replace Memcached and MySQL. ®

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