Feeds

Apple to cough up $100m after kids rinse parents' credit cards on apps

Compensation offered for virtual fruit spending sprees

The essential guide to IT transformation

Parents whose credit cards took a hammering after their kids went on iTunes spending sprees are in line for some compensation from Apple - in a lawsuit settlement that could cost the fruity biz $100m.

Parents were horrified to receive huge bills from their iTunes accounts for items such as virtual vegetables for iPad games. A number brought a class-action suit against Apple, filed with the Northern District of California Court on 11 April, 2011.

The legal action cited apps aimed at children that are free to download but encourage users to spend money in-game on goods such as fruit, vegetables, ammunition and currency.

In the settlement proposed on Friday - which is to be formally agreed in court on 1 March - Apple agreed to pay a minimum of $5 in compensation to American claimants who can prove that their children bought items on iTunes through in-app games without permission during a particular 45-day period.

And full refunds could be available if parents meet the above requirements and fill in an online claim form.

Apple will also pay the legal bill for the case and promised to send an email notification about the settlement to everyone who made an in-app purchase of Game Currency and would fall into the class affected.

Sums under $30 will be refunded in iTunes credits rather than cash.

At the heart of the case was the 15-minute authorisation window after a user signs into an iTunes account: an Apple ID and password is required for purchases on iTunes-linked credit cards but only for fifteen minutes after one signs in. Kids were able to buy items of value up to $99.99 with just one click during that window. And Apple takes 30 percent of all app sales through iTunes.

Apple has since changed the parental controls on devices allowing users to disable in-app purchases or require a password before every transaction. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
Microsoft refuses to nip 'Windows 9' unzip lip slip
Look at the shiny Windows 8.1, why can't you people talk about 8.1, sobs an exec somewhere
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?