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Turkish tattooists test talent with QR code ad

Tattoo parlour hopefuls urged to swap irons for pen

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The bafflingly ubiquitous Quick Response (QR) code may have finally found its ideal use case after a Turkish tattoo parlour decided to feature the 21st century bar-code in an ingenious scheme to weed out job applicants.

Istanbul ad agency BÜRO was recently hired by upmarket tattoo emporium Berrge Tattoo to help it hire some new artists, innovation web site psfk reported.

Given the rather unique nature of the work, would-be candidates could only learn how to apply for the job by completing a blank QR code offered in a flesh-coloured print advertisement. If completed well, the code would offer the chance to visit a a web site where an application form awaited. Sloppy colouring in would mean the code would not work, an effective test for candidates worthy of an interview.

Given that QR scanners typically allow around a 30 per cent margin of error, it may not be the most effective first screening process for candidates but it will certainly filter out those genuinely keen on the role in a manner without requiring any ink to be spilt in anger.

QR codes have risen from humble beginnings in mid-90s Japan to near ubiquity today on the back of growth in smartphone adoption.

Some of the more innovative uses of the codes have come from unlikely sources. Tesco has managed to close the gap on rival E-Mart in South Korea thanks to a multi-channel retail strategy involving “virtual shelves” on subway station posters featuring items and their QR codes.

Chinese e-commerce giant Yihaodian is set to take that to the next level by opening hundreds of virtual stores with a similar set-up – allowing users to shop with their mobile + QR code.

However, given the mundane marketing drivel most QR codes take the user to, El Reg thinks the Turkish ink slingers deserve special mention. ®

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