Feeds

Seagate joins OpenStack foundation and Open Compute Project

Drive giant revs involvement in open source tech

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

In an effort to stay relevant in the new cloudy world Seagate is loading money into OpenStack and joining the Open Compute Project.

The storage specialist "will help cloud builders to develop more scalable, customizable solutions using open platforms," it said in a statement on Wednesday, announcing its involvement.

"Seagate is excited to take the first of a number of industry changing steps in joining the open source community and leveraging our vast knowledge of storage and cloud optimized solutions to help foster the growth of cloud storage solutions," Seagate's veep of marketing Scott Horn trumpeted in a statement.

Becoming an OpenStack corporate sponsor will cost Seagate $25,000 and give it the right to use OpenStack's logo for commercial marketing, and will also give it a presence on various websites associated with the open source cloud software platform. Corporate sponsorship does not give Seagate any direct or indirect control over how the technology develops.

So, why get involved?

By actively involving itself in both cloud software, via OpenStack, and hardware, with the Open Compute Project, Seagate is hoping it can get on the inside track of tech development for large clouds - an area that it forecasts as storing more and more data over time.

"We're not going to open source the internals of the drives, but we'll be looking to work with the communities' hardware and software players," Ali Fenn, a senior director at Seagate, told The Register. "We recognize that these are the stacks of the future."

Other participants in the Open Compute Project include AMD and Intel, who have both produced custom motherboards, as well as a smorgasbord of traditional OEMs who are all tweaking gear to better fit inside mega datacenters.

"It's not lost on us where data is going to be stored in the future," she said. "It's going to be a significant shift to the extent that there is a dramatically increased amount of data being stored in the kinds of use cases that OCP is going to address."

By example, Facebook has pioneered the use of low-RPM — hence cheap — commodity drives in its 'Open Vault' storage array for the thrifty preservation of "cold data" (in Facebook's case, the rarely viewed holiday snaps that we put onto the network of us looking glum around the world).

Seagate thinks more and more data will be stored on systems like Open Vault, so its involvement in the OCP could help it make drives that will be bought for use inside these systems.

Seagate's involvement has been a long time coming - the OpenStack community members list already reads like a who's-who of the tech industry, and the Open Compute Project is much the same.

Why did Seagate wait so long to get involved? Fenn says there was a lot of discussion internally, but Seagate wanted to announce its involvement and swiftly follow with some technology, though she did not give a precise timeline for when this would happen.

Western Digital-subsidiary Hitachi Global Storage Technologies announced in mid-January that it had joined the Open Compute Project. Its reasons for involvement were much the same as Seagate's.

At the time of writing Toshiba didn't respond to queries from El Reg on its interest in the Open Compute Project. ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.