Feeds

Amazon ditches 'neo-Nazi' security firm over alleged harassment of workers

Etailer ends contract after documentary about guards at 'holiday camps'

The essential guide to IT transformation

Amazon has ditched a security firm accused of mistreating temporary workers at one of the etailer's German warehouses in Bad Hersfeld.

The web bazaar said it took the allegations against the warehouse guards "very seriously" and said it was terminating its contract with the company in question, Hensel European Security Services (Hess).

"Amazon is responsible for ensuring associates working in our fulfilllment centres are safe and treated with respect and dignity at all times and we constantly work to improve our processes in this regard," the company said in an emailed statement.

"It is clear that we failed to hold the contractor who was responsible for managing lodging, transportation and the security company for our temporary associates up to our high standards. Therefore we are ending our relationship with this company.

"We recently removed the security service from all of our locations. We have zero tolerance for discrimination and intimidation and we expect the same from companies working with us."

German state broadcaster ARD aired a documentary last week on employees' conditions in the holiday camps, where workers brought to Germany on temp contracts for Amazon's Christmas rush. During the documentary, as detailed by German news site The Local, workers claimed their rooms at the so-called "holiday camps" where they were given accommodation had been searched and said they were frisked at breakfast. There was also a suggestion that migrant workers from Spain and Poland got worse treatment from the security guards.

Hess has denied that it illegally searched staff accommodation or harassed workers based on their ethnicity. In a statement, Hess claimed that 70 per cent of its own staff have a foreign background, including people with Turkish, Polish and Czech roots.

Guards in the documentary were dressed in Thor Steinar branded clothes, a brand linked with neo-Nazism, which has been banned at football matches and by the German parliament.

Hess said that following the report, it had prohibited its employees from wearing such clothing. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.