Feeds

Turkey prepares to hand $5bn to US biz for intelligent electricity

Cementing relationships and saving 'leccy

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Turkey will spend $5bn over the next two years creating a smart grid to cope with increased energy consumption, and buying plenty of American kit with which to do it.

The US consulate in Istanbul put out the figure, Bloomberg notes, as it promotes a two-day conference on the subject. The conference itself is sponsored by the US Trade and Development Agency, which will see US companies pitching intelligent networks to Turkish utilities, and government reps, as well as discussing the regulatory environment which will be necessary to meet Turkey's energy needs.

This isn't just about Smart Meters, which only manage consumption in cloud-cuckoo land where everyone uses less power thanks to an LCD screen smiling at them: this is about generating power in the right place and delivering across the country at the right time, while making sure no one steals it en route.

The latter is such a problem that a company like Awesense is now offering to trace thefts for free, in exchange for a cut of the saved revenue. Awesense is a US startup which uses clamps placed on electricity lines, measuring current flow by induction and capable of creating a dynamic mesh (in the ISM band at 915MHz) to get the data back to the office. Check the flow at two ends of a wire - and if the loss is higher than predicted, you've found a thief. Just move the clamps and you'll know where they are.

Awesense is already involved in Turkey, but is typical of the way an intelligent electricity grid can be more efficient without relying on consumers to use less. Last year Turkish energy consumption rise by more than 5 per cent, while production only grew 4.2 per cent, so better solutions are needed.

But creating a Smart Grid will mean working together, and the Istanbul skyline is (as far as your correspondent is aware) the only one in the world graced with multiple TV transmission masts, because the broadcasters couldn't come to a sharing agreement, which bodes badly for cooperative agreements.

American companies will have high hopes of selling kit into Turkey, and following the historical route into the Middle East and beyond - Turkey will make an excellent showcase for what a smart grid can achieve, assuming it can achieve it. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?
MPAA calls Canadians a bunch of bootlegging movie thieves
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.