Feeds

DropBox seeks to woo IT admins with team data controls

Wants to beat down Microsoft, Google, Apple, EMC threats

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Dropbox is changing its cloud storage service to reassure IT administrators that they can control their users and not have sensitive information taking wing out of their corporate servers.

Last November the company claimed it had 100 million users, and that 95 per cent of Fortune 500 companies have at least one Dropbox user. That last stat is hardly impressive, given the nunmber of employees such firms have, but the company is increasingly focused on selling its "Dropbox for Teams" corporate product into small and medium sized business – moving out of the consumer ghetto and into paying enterprise customers.

The Teams product is designed to let groups within a company share documents and data over the Dropbox servers. It costs $795 per year for five users, and an extra $125 for every new team member. Some basic administrative tools come with the service, but now Dropbox has started revamping these to give IT administrators access to more information.

On Tuesday, the company added a new UI to the IT admin interface with added functions such as giving information on an individual's usage, the IP address from which they are logging in, the use of third-party applications within the Dropbox system, adding the ability to block accounts (if a laptop is stolen, for example), and including tools to enforce the use of two-factor authentication.

"These are the things that were defined as most important in the process of conversations with customers," Sujay Jaswa, VP of sales and business development, told The Register. "If we look at what people have been asking for, then this captures a huge percentage of those things."

Dropbox has carved out a respectable niche in the cloud storage business, but is facing increasing competition from Microsoft SkyDrive, Google Drive, Apple iCloud and enterprise-specific services such as EMC's Syncplicity scheme. But Jaswa said the company wasn't concerned about the big boys muscling in on its turf. "In our sales calls, it's only a single digit of those calls that even mention a competitor. They're not doing the comparison shopping thing," he said.

Nevertheless, it's going to be interesting to see if the larger firms can leverage their enterprise user base to exclude the plucky start-up. Expect much more movement in this market over the coming year from Dropbox and its foes. ®

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy
Now that's a LOT of porn or pirated movies. Or, you know, other consumer stuff
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.