Feeds

Adobe muzzles TWO zero-day wild things with emergency Flash patches

Critical block for active Win and Mac attacks

Security for virtualized datacentres

Updated Adobe published a critical Flash Player update on Thursday that fixes not just one but two zero-day flaws, both under active attack by hackers.

Both Windows and Mac users are in the firing line. One of the vulnerabilities (CVE-2013-0633) is being harnessed in targeted attacks designed to trick marks into opening a Microsoft Word document email attachment that contains malicious Flash (SWF) content. The exploit targets the ActiveX version of Flash Player on Windows.

The second vulnerability (CVE-2013-0634) is designed to attack Safari and Firefox browser users on Macs. The assault involves malicious Flash (SWF) content delivered by a drive-by download-style attack from booby-trapped websites. The second vulnerability is also being abused to hack Windows machines using malicious Word attachments, again featuring malicious Flash content.

Users of Adobe Flash Player 11.5.502.146 and earlier for Windows and Macintosh should update to Adobe Flash Player 11.5.502.149, as explained in an emergency bulletin by Adobe. The updates also cover Flash on Linux and for Android smartphones - although the need to update on those instances is not as pressing.

Users of Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 10 will get built-in Flash components updates automatically from Google and Microsoft, respectively.

Early indications don't shed much light on who is being attacked in the wild but the seriousness of the flaws and the potential for harm is beyond doubt. Exploitation of flaws in Adobe Flash, along with Java flaws, browser vulnerabilities and PDF exploits are among the most prevalent hacking tactics and have been for at least a couple of years. It's worth going through Adobe's irksome update process to apply these fixes. Patch now or risk getting pwned later. ®

Update: Exploit used to target aerospace industry

Security tools firm AlienVault reports that Microsoft Office files containing the exploit have cropped up in an spearphishing campaign targeting businesses in the aerospace industry, among others. One of these files uses an 2013 IEEE Aerospace Conference schedule as a lure.

Another sample containing the exploit is themed around information about an online payroll system that's primarily used in the US.

In both cases the booby-trapped Word .doc files contain an embedded flash file with no compression or obfuscation.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.