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RSA adds Big Data analytics to security service suite

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In just under a month, security folks are coming to San Francisco for the annual RSA show, and if Wednesday's announcement from the company is to go by, one of the major themes at conference will be Big Data.

At a press conference at its Massachusetts headquarters, RSA unveiled its Security Analytics appliance that's designed to plug into large corporate networks and churn through huge chunks of data looking for security problems. RSA has also included real-time malware detection, threat monitoring, and heuristic analysis, so consultants can get an accurate read on any threats as they happen.

"It's all about mixing full monitoring capabilities with compliance and reporting in a fully scalable architecture," Paul Stamp, director of product marketing at RSA told The Register. "It's the first appliance on the market to do these kind of log analytics and data reconstruction."

The system uses a decoder to capture all layer 2-7 traffic with a concentrator to index metadata into a form usable by the analytics engine. A Hadoop-based warehouse of three or more nodes is included for long-term analysis of large data sets, and the system reports back with an HTML5 user interface.

RSA is also touting the system as helping with corporate compliance returns. Security Analytics is HIPAA and SOX-compliant, as well as being ready for BASEL II and ISO 27002, and can automate many of the reporting procedures needed.

RSA isn't the first in the security Big Data field, however. In October, IBM claimed that title with the release of its InfoSphere Guardium v9 for Hadoop security system. It seems more than a few vendors are keen to bring some of the Big Data hype to the security space.

"The Big Data phenomenon could help address this situation for security professionals, making it important for organizations to rethink their choice of security solutions," said Jon Oltsik, principal analyst at the Enterprise Strategy Group.

"Marrying intelligence-driven security with Big Data analytics has the potential to help enterprises address the complex problem of advanced threats and thus meet a significant need in the marketplace." ®

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