Feeds

Customer service rep fired for writing game that mocks callers

Canadian tax office has sense of humor failure

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

David Gallant, a worker at the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and gaming hobbyist, has been fired for lampooning dealings with customers during his day job in a game called I Get This Call Every Day.

"Because I've become nothing more than a numb meat popsicle I've decided to make a game about my day job," he said on his website. "I'm hoping the proceeds of this game will get me a few steps closer to less day job and more game making."

Gallant, a self-taught user of ActionScript, Flixel, and Unity, built the game using very basic graphics and a sense of humor. It puts the player in the role of a customer service agent answering an endless series of inane customer calls. If the player is terse or crabby, or handles the call incorrectly, then they lose.

While the makers of Call of Duty are hardly likely to be shaking in their shoes at the competition, it's a cute idea and Gallant was selling the game at $2 a pop. But when the Toronto Star did a feature on it, his employers suffered a massive sense of humor failure about the situation.

"The Minister considers this type of conduct offensive and completely unacceptable," said a spokesman for the Canadian National Revenue Minister Gail Shea. "The Minister has asked the Commissioner to investigate and take any and all necessary corrective action. The Minister has asked the CRA to investigate urgently to ensure no confidential taxpayer information was compromised."

The Commissioner didn't waste any time, and within 24 hours Gallant reported via Twitter that he was in search of a new employer after being fired. On the plus side, however, it seems his games business has received a boost from the whole affair.

It seems more than a little harsh to fire an employee for showing a sense of humor and initiative, and the workplace has already inspired many creative endeavors. El Reg wishes Mr. Gallant much luck in his new career, and suspect he'll be a lot happier than in his last job. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.