Feeds

BT inks 2 more gov-funded broadband deals

But work WON'T be done 'til 2016

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

BT bagged two more government-subsidised broadband contracts on Wednesday, when it confirmed that work on those separate rural projects would not be completed until 2016.

A pattern is now clearly emerging that shows communications minister Ed Vaizey was right to describe the Ministry of Fun's target to ensure all Brits get at least 2Mbit/s broadband, and super-fast connections for 90 per cent of properties across Blighty, as "challenging".

National telco BT - whose Openreach men and women have to deploy the cabling - appears to be more realistic about how long the work will take.

Meanwhile, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport has recently been blaming any perceived delays on foot-dragging by Brussels officials in clearing state aid for the deployment of faster broadband in rural parts of Britain at a cost of £530m.

But a spokeswoman at competition commissioner Joaquin Almunia's office told The Register late last year that the EC had always treated the matter as a priority and said it could carry out its assessment of the Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) project only after the UK authorities had provided the necessary information. Apparently, it took Maria Miller's department many months to do this.

As for BT's latest BDUK contract wins, the telecoms giant said it had finally settled on a £93m agreement with Devon and Somerset. The company had been wrangling with the councils over the fine print, but that has now been smoothed out.

The company, which is investing £41m into the rollout in that region, said it would bring mainly fibre-to-the-cabinet (FTTC) broadband technology to 90 per cent of premises by the end of 2016.

The two councils are divvying up the costs, coughing £10m a piece, while a further £32m will come from the BDUK pot.

But while representatives of Connecting Devon and Somerset were willing to be a bit chatty about disagreements with BT last week, now that the deal is done the group's spokeswoman has declined to comment outside of the official press release.

Vaizey, meanwhile, appeared to be in denial mode about delays. He said:

"It is projects like 'Connecting Devon and Somerset', the largest of all the English Local Authority projects and encompassing six different local authority areas, that will help us achieve government's aim for the UK to have the best broadband in Europe by 2015."

Separately, Wiltshire and South Gloucestershire announced that it had inked a £35.6m deal with BT. That work won't be completed until March 2016, either. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.