Feeds

Is your Surface Pro a bit full? Slot in an SD card, it's not from Apple

iPad a bit full? Bad luck, buy a new one

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Comment There's massive internet coverage today of a major "issue" with the forthcoming Microsoft Surface Pro slab, the latest attempt by Redmond to unseat Apple's iPad line from its global tablet throne. It's being widely reported that the Surface Pro arrives with a lot of its onboard storage already full up: but this is a foolish criticism to focus on.

That's because the Surface Pro isn't an iPad, and therefore it has a storage card slot. For a small and continually-decreasing price, you can buy a microSD card and pop it in. At the moment you can get a 32GB card for less than £15, upping the baseline Pro's storage by 50 per cent. It's an XC slot, too, meaning that you can get a 64GB card if you need it (for less than £50). Some time this year 128GB cards will appear, and the format goes to 2TB so the capacities will keep on going up.

So if your Surface Pro (or your other non-Apple tablet, though there are some exceptions like the Nexus 7) ever fills up, it will cost you a trivial sum to get lots more room.

Card full up too? Buy the next biggest card and copy all your existing stuff onto it. It'll be cheap and simple. Some of us have been doing this for a while, carrying the same ever-growing load of data along from device to device, card to card. No fiddling about trying to stuff gigabytes up into cloud services through narrow pipes, no wireless transfers: just easy rapid copying from old card to new bigger card (probably using a costs-pennies USB gizmo plugged into an actual computer).

It's not so simple if you're an Apple lover. If your iOS device ever fills up, you will have no remedy but to buy a new one. The masterminds of Cupertino have just announced a new 128GB iPad, as it happens.

So let us regard the unhappy Surface Pro 64GB user of the near future as he or she quickly tops up his or her device's storage, and, grumbling, is forced to cough up £45 or less to double the machine's capacity in a trivially easy operation. It's hard to see why Microsoft even bothered having a 128GB version, really.

Now regard the much more unfortunate top-of-the-range 64GB iPadder in the same predicament. To get the same result, the downtrodden fanboi must cough a minimum £639, maybe £739.

So the story isn't "the Surface doesn't have enough storage", it's really - as it has been ever since the iPhone appeared - "iOS devices continue to lack expandable storage, and unbelievably Apple users continue to put up with it". ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays
Bad computers might ask if you are Sarah Connor
4K video on terrestrial TV? Not if the WRC shares frequencies to mobiles
Have your say with Ofcom now, before Freeview becomes Feeview
YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS
Old hardware doesn't get any faster with new software
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
You didn't get the MeMO? Asus Pad 7 Android tab is ... not bad
Really, er, stands out among cheapie 7-inchers
Apple winks at parents: C'mon, get your kid a tweaked Macbook Pro
Cheapest models given new processors, more RAM
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Microsoft stands on shore as tablet-laden boat sails away
Brit buyers still not falling for Windows' charms
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.