Feeds

Yay for iOS 6.1, grey Wi-Fi iPhone bug is fix- AWW, SNAP

Fanbois resort to using hairdryer, freezer on iPhones

Top three mobile application threats

When Apple rolled out iOS 6.1, its first major update to iOS 6, yesterday, it introduced a series of bug fixes, software tweaks for iTunes and Siri and also added LTE support - but none of that was any use to the disconnected and discontented sufferers of a particular iPhone software flaw: greyed-out Wi-Fi.

iPhone owners have detailed the grey Wi-Fi problem on Apple forums since September 2012, when iOS 6 first came out. One thread has 2,700 replies and over 400,000 views. The problem appears to affect all models of iPhone, including the 5. The owners of functioning iPhone 4s, iPhone 4Ss and 3 models found their Wi-Fi command button greyed out after updating to iOS 6. New iPhone 5 owners were simply unable to turn it on.

A screengrab of greyed-out wifi button on iOS6, credit Jong186 on Apple forums

The greyed out Wi-Fi button

The iOS 6.0.1 software update brought no relief and looks like there was no fix in the iOS 6.1 upgrade released yesterday, either. The OS 6.1 upgrade is relatively slim-featured for an update, described as mainly a bunch of fixes rather than the introduction of big new features. This makes it more of a shame that this important fix has been left out.

Koalafishmutant said:

Updated to 6.1 No solve: wifi is still grey out. Apple, that was the last iPhone i bought.

Some posters said they had downgraded their software to iOS 5.1.1, while others exchanged their handsets. But those who couldn't - because the guarantees had run out or they had bought their handsets in different countries were left lumbered with phones unable to access Wi-Fi networks.

Some turned to wild solutions: including wrapping the device in a towel and putting it in the freezer.

Another heated the device up in a special place with a hairdryer:

This is a general idea of where you should be aiming your hairdryer (the yellow highlighter). Its best to avoid the red x area because this is the battery. Keep hairdryer four five inches from the phone or higher as you wish, the hot air will still reach. Let the phone completely cool down before you start using it.

Heating iPhone 5 with a hairdryer, credit Ibrahim, Apple forums

One commenter found that heating his iPhone with a hairdryer in a location just below the earphone jack allowed it to connect to the Wi-Fi network. Credit: Ibrahim, Apple support forums

Which - surprisingly - appeared to work for some.

We asked Apple for a comment and have received no reply. ®

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.