Feeds

Cameron's speech puts UK adoption of EU data directive in doubt

Biz types have Tories' ear... so if they win election, all bets are off

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Opinion Cameron’s speech puts UK accession to any Data Protection Regulation and Directive in doubt.

In yesterday’s speech on the relationship between the UK and the Europe Union, the Prime Minister raised doubts as to whether the UK will adopt both the proposed Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Directive in the field of law enforcement.

Reading the runes: if the Conservatives win the next General Election, I think that implementation of both Regulation and Directive is unlikely.

Why am I saying this? First, the Conservatives are going to consult business about the EU regulations they want to keep; how many businesses do you think will respond with: “Well that nice Data Protection Regulation is top of my list”?

Then look at the timings: The General Election is in 2014/15; any referendum would be in 2017; negotiations with the EU in 2015-2017; and the (optimistic) commencement of the Regulation is 2016. This is smack in the middle of the negotiations - which means the regulation is an obvious target for negotiations.

Finally, the Conservatives are to look at what competences they want to return. So consider the notion of “return of competences” in the context of the following extracts from the PM’s speech, intertwined with the commentary on the Directive and Regulation from last week.

In his speech, the PM said: “There is a crisis of European competitiveness, as other nations across the world soar ahead”. In its criticism of the Data Protection Regulation, the government states that it “is seriously concerned about the potential economic impact of the proposed Regulation. At a time when the Eurozone appears to be slipping back into recession, reducing the regulatory burden to secure growth must be the priority for all Member States”.

In his speech, the PM said: “And I want us to be pushing to exempt Europe's smallest entrepreneurial companies from more EU Directives.” In the criticism of the Data Protection Regulation, the government states: “At a time when the Eurozone appears to be slipping back into recession, reducing the regulatory burden to secure growth must be the priority for all Member States. It is therefore difficult to justify the extra red-tape and tick box compliance that the proposal represents”. In addition, it maintained: “[W]e estimate the costs for UK small businesses of simply demonstrating compliance with the proposals to be around £10 million” (in 2012–13 earnings terms) and in terms of the “whole economy of £100–£360 million per annum (in 2012–13 earnings terms).”

In his speech, the PM said: “In Britain we have already launched our balance of competences review – to give us an informed and objective analysis of where the EU helps and where it hampers”. In its criticism of the Data Protection Regulation, the Government stated that “the Government’s position that the proposed Regulation should be re-cast” to “allow for harmonisation in the areas where it is advantageous and flexibility for Member States where it is required” and that “the proposed Regulation places prescriptive obligations upon data controllers”.

In his speech, the PM said: “Let us not be misled by the fallacy that a deep and workable single market requires everything to be harmonised, to hanker after some unattainable and infinitely level playing field.” In its criticism of the Data Protection Regulation, the government said: “[T]his is a ‘one size fits all’ approach which does not allow data controllers (from small online retailers to multinational Internet companies) to adopt their own practices in order to ensure compliance with the legislation.”

In his speech, the PM said: “Some of this antipathy about Europe in general really relates of course to the European Court of Human Rights, rather than the EU. And Britain is leading European efforts to address this.

This is undisguised code for the UK withdrawing support from the European Convention of Human Rights in favour of a localised UK Bill of Rights which is very likely to weaken the obligation to respect “private and family life” by allowing more flexible interference by public authorities.

In his speech, the PM said that the government was “[l]aunching a process to return some existing justice and home affairs powers”. In the criticism of the law enforcement Data Protection Directive, the government said that it “does not consider that full harmonisation of police and judicial co-operation in criminal matters is necessary or desirable”. This is because “introducing prescriptive requirements for domestic processing may instead have a detrimental effect on law enforcement operations, placing onerous burdens on data controllers and huge costs on public authorities”.

In summary: I think it is clear that the government sees the Data Protection Regulation primarily as a burden on business. If the other Member States don't change its text, then the Regulation is very likely to be a candidate for an opt-out. In the promised referendum, if UK voters decide the leave the EU, then it’s also goodbye to the Regulation. Either way, its bye-bye.

In any event, it is clear that the UK wants nothing to do with the Data Protection Directive in the field of law enforcement. That is definitely “toast” if there is a Conservative government after the next election.

References:

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.