Feeds

Wikimedia gets the travel bug with Wikivoyage

Just what the world needs: another travel site in search results

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

The Wikimedia foundation has extended its “mission is to empower a global volunteer community to collect and develop the world's knowledge” by adding a travel site to its portfolio of online services.

Wikivoyage, as the new site is called, is billed as a non-commercial source of traveller-penned travel advice and already offers more than 50,000 pages.

That stance takes the site into territory very close to that inhabited by TripAdvisor, a for-profit site that has generated controversy because it has not always been particularly responsive when asked to moderate negative reviews. Allegations that some of those negative reviews come rival travel businesses hoping to game the site with false reports about their competitors have also dogged the site.

Those allegations make an independent alternative welcome, but many may feel that alternative already exists in the form of wikitravel.org. That site carries no obvious signs of paid content and offers the same “anyone can edit” facility as Wikimedia's sites, but the fine print points out it is owned by an outfit called Internet Brands.

Whether Wikivoyage can avoid some of the edit wars that have plagued its encyclopaedic parent remains to be seen.

Yet even if its articles aren't always stellar, the advent of the new, “official” tourism Wiki may be a boon for travellers given Wikimedia's status as the world's fifth-most-trafficked web site should see its (hopefully) independent articles propelled high into organic search results. The travel sector is currently noted for vigorous search engine optimisation activity that sees hotel booking services dominate results for the names of many tourist hotspots. If Wikivoyages can make some of those tactics less effective, it will do travellers a service even if its articles don't make the planet less lonely. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?
They can take our lives, but they'll never take our SPECTRUM
Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins
We don't need no steenkin' TCP/IP retransmission and the congestion it causes
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
NBN Co adds apartments to FTTP rollout
Commercial trial locations to go live in September
Samsung Z Tizen OS mobe is post-phoned – this time for good?
Russian launch for Sammy's non-droid knocked back
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
What FTC lawsuit? T-Mobile US touts 10GB, $100 family-of-4 plan
Folks 'could use that money for more important things' says CEO Legere
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.